NEAT July 2002 Interesting Objects

In July we discovered 9 NEAs with NEAT: 3 Amors with 2 > 1 km, 5 Apollos including 1 PHA and 1> 1km, and 1 Aten. We also discovered 2 periodic comets, one with a perihelion near the Earth's orbit.



Designat. NEAT name & Image Disc. with NEAT/ Date Vel. (deg/day) Mag. Size in km (miles) Orbit Visual. Comment*
2002 NK RWQF1GB Palomar 1 Jul 0.5 19 - - Not NEA
2002 NV RXV2AGB Palomar 4 Jul 0.6 19 1.5 (0.9) orbit Amor-Large
2002 NW RY6R5TC Palomar 5 Jul 1.4 19 0.09 (0.05) orbit Apollo
2002 NX RY8GT8C Palomar 5 Jul 1.5 17 0.7 (0.4) orbit Apollo
- RZ92CTA Palomar 8 Jul 0.7 20 - - Not real or lost
2002 NJ7 RZO1LDB Palomar 9 Jul 0.3 20 - - Not NEA
1999 NB5 S0Q236A Palomar 12 Jul 1.1 19 - - Previously known Apollo--PHA
- S1R7SUA Palomar 15 Jul 0.05 19 - - Not real or lost
2002 NY31 S1T71LB Palomar 15 Jul 0.8 18 1.5 (0.9) orbit Amor-Large with high inclination
2002 OM4 S2JZS5A Palomar 17 Jul 0.8 20 1.5 (0.9) orbit Apollo-Large with high inclination
2002 OS4 S37Z9JA Palomar 19 Jul 1.0 18 1.0 (0.6) orbit Amor
2002 OV21 S3YN6IA Palomar 21 Jul 0.1 19 - - Not NEA
2002 OX7 S3ZNKBA Palomar 21 Jul 0.3 19 - - Not NEA
2002 OD20 S3ZNKIA Palomar 21 Jul 0.4 20 1.0 (0.6) orbit Apollo-PHA
2002 OU7 S3ZV3XC Palomar 21 Jul 0.3 19 - - Not NEA
2002 OC20 S4CURMA Palomar 22 Jul 0.08 19 - - Not NEA
2002 OX21 S6SQ6AA Palomar 29 Jul 0.3 30 - - Not NEA
- S6SWWMA Palomar 29 Jul 0.7 20 - - Not real or lost
Comet P/2002 O8 (NEAT) S6TU26A Palomar 29 Jul 0.2 17 - orbit Periodic comet with perihelion between Mars and Jupiter
2002 OH21 S6TXA0A Palomar 29 Jul 0.04 17 - - Not NEA
2002 OY21 S6TXT5B Palomar 29 Jul 1.6 18 0.4 (0.24) orbit Apollo
2002 OW21 S6V10CC Palomar 29 Jul 0.6 20 - - Not NEA
2002 OJ21 S6VDQ2C Palomar 29 Jul 0.5 19 - - Not NEA
2002 OA22 S74QIYA Palomar 30 Jul 0.9 20 0.7 (0.4) orbit Aten
Comet P/2002 O5 (NEAT) S75UY9 MSSS 30 Jul 1.4 17 - orbit Periodic comet- IAUC 7942 -with perihelion near the Earth's orbit.

*Amors, Apollos, and Atens are the three categories of Near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). Amor asteroids approach the Earth's orbit from the outside, Apollo asteroids cross the Earth's orbit, and Aten asteroids approach the Earth's orbit from the inside. Potentially Hazardous asteroids (PHAs) are larger than ~200 m (0.1 mile) and approach close enough to present a potential hazard but not a current hazard.