NEAT May 2002 Interesting Objects

In May we discovered 5 NEAs with NEAT: 4 Amors including 1>1km, and 1 Aten. We also discovered 3 comets: C/2002 J4 (NEAT), C/2002 K1 (NEAT), and C/2002 K4 (NEAT); and one high-eccentricity Mars-crossing asteroid.



Designat. NEAT name & Image Disc. with NEAT/ Date Vel. (deg/day) Mag. Size in km (miles) Orbit Visual. Comment*
1999 JE1 RBURI4A Palomar 5 May 1.3 19 - - Apollo, not discovered with NEAT
2002 JA9 RBVMXJB Palomar 5 May 0.4 20 0.7 (0.4) orbit Amor
2002 GY9 RC8J4TB Palomar 6 May 0.8 19 - - Not NEA
2002 JQ97 RDAC5UB Palomar 9 May 0.3 20 0.1 (0.06) orbit Amor
C/2002 J4 (NEAT) RESEKDB Palomar 13 May 0.1 18 - orbit Comet NEAT-IAUC 7899-has a parabolic orbit with perihelion between Mars and Jupiter.
2002 JR100 RF4VNRC Palomar 14 May 1.6 20 0.09 (0.05) orbit Aten
2002 KR RFRGBVC Palomar 16 May 0.4 20 Not NEA
C/2002 K1 (NEAT) RFWI14 MSSS 16 May 0.3 20 - orbit Comet-IAUC 7902--has a parabolic orbit with perihelion between Mars and Jupiter. The orbit is nearly perpendicular to the ecliptic.
- RFWPDB MSSS 16 May 0.1 20 - - Not real or lost
2002 KJ9 RFWPMA MSSS 16 May 0.7 21 - - Not NEA
2002 KJ3 RGI8YUC Palomar 18 May 0.4 20 0.7 (0.4) orbit Amor
2002 KJ8 RGICO0C Palomar 18 May 0.2 21 0.4 (0.2) orbit Not NEA-high eccentricity, Mars crossing asteroid
2002 KD4 RGL8LIC Palomar 18 May 0.1 20 - - Not NEA
- RGLBTBC Palomar 18 May 0.3 21 - - Lost or not real
2002 KL6 RJTH11 MSSS 27 May 1.4 17 1.5 (0.9) orbit Amor-large
C/2002 K4 (NEAT) RJUK0O MSSS 27 May 0.4 18 - orbit Comet-IAUC 7909--has a parabolic orbit with perihelion between Mars and Jupiter. The orbit is nearly perpendicular to the ecliptic.
- RK3KETA Palomar 28 May 0.5 18 - - Not real or lost
- RK80Q5 MSSS 28 May 0.1 20 - - Not real or lost
- RKTYI6B Palomar 30 May 2.8 19 - - Lost or not real

*Amors, Apollos, and Atens are the three categories of Near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). Amor asteroids approach the Earth's orbit from the outside, Apollo asteroids cross the Earth's orbit, and Aten asteroids approach the Earth's orbit from the inside. Potentially Hazardous asteroids (PHAs) are larger than ~200 m (0.1 mile) and approach close enough to present a potential hazard but not a current hazard.